Scholar-officials in the Ming Dynasty

During the Ming dynasty, the Neo-Confucian doctrines of the Song scholar Zhu Xi were embraced by the court and the Chinese literati at large, although the direct line of his school was destroyed by the Yongle Emperor's extermination of the ten degrees of kinship of Fang Xiaoru in 1402.

Society of the Song dynasty

Chinese society during the Song dynasty (960–1279) was marked by political and legal reforms, a philosophical revival of Confucianism, and the development of cities beyond administrative purposes into centers of trade, industry, and maritime commerce.

Han-Manchu marriages and its historical significance

The Qing victory was overwhelmingly the result of the defection of the Ming dynasty's Liaodong military establishment and other defectors, with the Manchu military playing a very minor role. 

Construction of the Forbidden City

The Forbidden City (Chinese: 故宫; pinyin: Gùgōng) is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. It houses the Palace Museum, and was the former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty to the end of the Qing dynasty (the years 1420 to 1912). The Forbidden City served as the home of emperors and their households and was the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years.

Mongol Empire: the largest contiguous land empire in history

The Mongol Empire — at its height the largest contiguous empire in history — had a lasting impact, unifying large regions. Some of these (such as eastern and western Russia and the western parts of China) remain unified today.

Transition from Sui Dynasty to Tang Dynasty

The transition from Sui to Tang started roughly around 613 when Emperor Yang of Sui launched his first of three failed campaigns against Goguryeo, and ended in 628, when Emperor Gaozu's son Li Shimin annexed the agrarian rebel ruler Liang Shidu's state of Liang.

The Grand Canal that serves not only as a means of transportation

The Jing-Hang Grand Canal linking the Yellow River and Yangtze River nominally runs between Beijing and Hangzhou over a total length of 1,794 km. Its main role throughout its history was the transport of grain to the capital. 

Rise of Northern Wei (386–535) and the Sinicization movement

With the fall of the Northern Liang in 439, Emperor Taiwu united northern China, ending the Sixteen Kingdoms period and beginning the Northern and Southern dynasties period with their southern rivals, the Liu Song.

Battle of Fei River

Legend has it that, as Fu Jiān escaped, he screamed to the sky, "Heaven has annihilated me!"(天亡我也!)

Shang Yang and his political reforms

Shang Yang was a statesman and reformer of the State of Qin during the Warring States period. His policies laid the administrative and political foundations that would enable Qin to conquer all of China and unite the country for the first time.

Recent Posts